Friday, December 4, 2015

Lesson Plan for "American Born Chinese"

This one was tough. I had to create a lesson plan for my YA Lit class and use it with my peers as my students. Talk about nerve racking! I was pretty nervous, but I think it turned out alright. Below is my self evaluation after the lesson followed by the lesson plan itself.

The class had an option of two books, only 3 people chose to read American Born Chinese, which was a little disappointing for me. I think, though that my lesson plan went well considering that I had a very small and quiet group. It was difficult to get discussion going and to keep it going with the quiet ones, but I learned the importance of having a lot of bank questions. We used all of them. It was nice that we got to go over so much material in the book, but I would have rather had a more robust discussion about a few questions than short answers to so many. I could have used more practice before the lesson and I am really glad that my first lesson ever was with the students from my class. Everyone participated, but I really was hoping for a bit of a larger group. For future lessons, I will have to make sure to have much more material prepared just in case I have a quiet class again. I’m not sure what all you would like to have for this response, but I honestly don’t have much to say. In short; it went well but, it could have gone better if I were a more prepared teacher.

American Born Chinese Lesson Plan
“It’s easy to become anything you wish… so long as you are willing to forfeit your soul”.


Goals:
Define and discuss stereotyping.
Discuss the use of the graphic novel format.
Discuss the ending and the big reveal in terms of idenity.


Text:
American Born Chinese written and illustrated by Gene Luen Yang


Common Core Standards
CC.9-10.R.L.2 Key Ideas and Details: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
CC.9-10.R.L.3 Key Ideas and Details: Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.
CC.9-10.R.L.4 Craft and Structure: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone).
CC.9-10.R.L.5 Craft and Structure: Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise.
CC.9-10.R.I.2 Key Ideas and Details: Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
CC.9-10.R.I.3 Key Ideas and Details: Analyze how the author unfolds an analysis or series of ideas or events, including the order in which the points are made, how they are introduced and developed, and the connections that are drawn between them.
CC.9-10.R.I.5 Craft and Structure: Analyze in detail how an author’s ideas or claims are developed and refined by particular sentences, paragraphs, or larger portions of a text (e.g., a section or chapter).
CC.9-10.W.1 Text Types and Purposes: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
CC.9-10.W.1.b Text Types and Purposes: Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly, supplying evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audience’s knowledge level and concerns.
CC.9-10.W.2 Text Types and Purposes: Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.
CC.9-10.SL.1 Comprehension and Collaboration: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
CC.9-10.SL.1.a Comprehension and Collaboration: Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.
CC.9-10.SL.1.c Comprehension and Collaboration: Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions.
CC.9-10.SL.1.d Comprehension and Collaboration: Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives, summarize points of agreement and disagreement, and, when warranted, qualify or justify their own views and understanding and make new connections in light of the evidence and reasoning presented.
CC.9-10.SL.4 Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas: Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and task.
CC.9-10.L.1 Conventions of Standard English: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
CC.9-10.L.1.b Conventions of Standard English: Use various types of phrases (noun, verb, adjectival, adverbial, participial, prepositional, absolute) and clauses (independent, dependent; noun, relative, adverbial) to convey specific meanings and add variety and interest to writing or presentations.
CC.9-10.L.2 Conventions of Standard English: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
CC.9-10.L.2.c Conventions of Standard English: Spell correctly.
CC.9-10.L.5 Vocabulary Acquisition and Use: Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.
CC.9-10.L.5.a Vocabulary Acquisition and Use: Interpret figures of speech (e.g., satire, sarcasm) in context and analyze their role in the text.
CC.9-10.R.H.5 Craft and Structure: Analyze how a text uses structure to emphasize key points or advance an explanation or analysis
CC.9-10.R.ST.2 Key Ideas and Details: Determine the central ideas or conclusions of a text; trace the text’s explanation or depiction of a complex process, phenomenon, or concept; provide an accurate summary of the text.
CC.9-10.W.HST.1 Text Types and Purposes: Write arguments focused on discipline-specific content.
CC.9-10.W.HST.1.a Text Types and Purposes: Introduce precise claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that establishes clear relationships among the claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.
CC.9-10.W.HST.1.b Text Types and Purposes: Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly, supplying data and evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both claim(s) and counterclaims in a discipline-appropriate form and in a manner that anticipates the audience’s knowledge level and concerns.


Lesson:
  • students are prepared with 2-3 questions regarding the novel
  • choose one prepared question to give to another student
  • make sure everyone has a different question
  • allow 5 minutes to write short answer
  • take turns - share question and answer
    • discuss each question as a group


Bank Questions!

  • discuss the graphic novel format
    • could this book have been successfully written as a traditional novel?
    • how did the use of pictures help propel the narrative?
    • how did the use of pictures help the reader understand character motivation?
  • what is a stereotype?
    • what is some evidence of stereotyping in this novel?
    • how can stereotypes affect a person’s attitude toward self?
  • how could being apart of two cultures affect one's identity?
  • is there such a thing as being overly Americanized?
  • this novel is told from three perspectives, why is each story told differently?
  • Chin-Kee
    • what is the significance of the laugh track?
    • what was your impression of Chin-kee?
    • why do you think Chin-kee is important? unimportant?
      • why do you think Yang included Chin-kee in this novel?
  • Ending
    • did you see the ending coming?
    • did you figure out who was whom?
      • how was the transformation foreshadowed through text? pictures?

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